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Portland, Oregon sushi restaurant has origami tessellations?

I saw this story come up on my Technorati search feed on “origami tessellations”. How random is that? I’m guessing it’s tessellations of origami, and not the kind of tessellations that we do, but still it seemed interesting. I’ll have to try to remember to check this out if I’m ever in Portland!

Having enjoyed great success with its downtown location (406 SW 13th), Masu recently built a branch in Southeast. There, origami tessellations hang on the walls, and futons lay behind the chairs. At the gorgeous, wood-paneled sushi bar, the chefs move fluidly. Light glints off knives. Chopping sounds fill the air. The rich smell of the freshest fish available is everywhere.

Mmmm… Sushi!

4 Comments

  1. Funny that they just mention it in passing like anyone reading it would know what they were talking about… Especially seeing as a lot of people I talk about origami tessellations to say, “What’s a tessellation?”, let alone an _origami_ tessellation…

  2. Yesterday, I was killing time in Florence while my skates were being sharpened and went to a secondhand book shop. Scored a couple of rare Sam Delany paperbacks and also saw this. I picked it up and leafed through it. Only thing that piqued my interest was a photo of a ten-sided twist and a mention of it having been given to the author by Chris Palmer. The blurb mentions that he works in glassine, which is easy to fold. (By which we conclude, she knows nothing of glassine.) However, the book jacket mentions that the author, Helen Hiebert, lives in Portland.

    Is that the connection? Could be.

  3. That’s really cool! Being from Portland, I’ll have to see if my mom can take me there! I’ll take pictures. We don’t get over the river very often though…

  4. Philip, it’s very strange that you mention that- I was in an art supply shop in St. Paul (what’s with the italianate catholic names? hmm) yesterday and I saw that SAME book as well! I didn’t look through it enough to see the Palmer reference, though.

    I did find the commonplace attitude towards our rather niche art form somewhat strange, which is why the article really seemed odd to me. (And of course that is what prompted me to share it…)

    Ryan, I highly recommend you investigate if you have the chance! I’d be curious to hear what you find!

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